Infographic Blog Post- Brea Jones

As the world continues into the seventh month of the pandemic, statistics from Covidtracker.com show that people of color, mostly Black and Hispanic people, are contracting COVID-19 at higher rates compared to white people nationwide.

The CDC states there are social determinants of health that put minority groups at risk of catching and dying from COVID-19 which include: discrimination, healthcare access and utilization, occupation, educational status, and income as well as housing.

People of color and women disproportionately account for a large percentage of essential workers. According to a study from the Center for Economic and Policy Research, Black workers make up about one in six front-line-industry workers.

These positions often have low wages and poor health care options, leaving workers vulnerable and unable to defend themselves or their families against COVID-19.

In Florida, there are 663,994 confirmed cases of COVID-19 with the impact hitting Black Floridians the hardest.

Using data from Statista.com detailing Florida’s population by race and data from Covidtracker.com, I calculated the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases in Florida per 100,000 people by race.

There are 2978 per 100,000 Black Floridians compared to 1264 White Floridians.

One solution for essentials workers, according to the Economic Policy Institute, would be to join a union to receive benefits such as higher pay, better access to sick leave, healthcare and more.

The CDC believes that community and faith-based organization’s play a role in promoting access to healthcare, stating we must work together to ensure “that people have resources to maintain and manage their physical and mental health, including easy access to information, affordable testing, and medical and mental health care.”

Data Source: https://covidtracking.com/race

Data Chart: https://covidtracking.com/race/about#download-the-data

Original link: https://medium.com/fiu-news-visualization/infographic-blog-post-brea-jones-22023e114f2f

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